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  •The Phantom Strikes Again
  •Appliance Comparison
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  •How Low Can You Go?
  •Care and Feeding of CF Bulbs
  •Take an LED light for a spin
  •Showered with Feedback
  •The heat is on for new records
  •Charting the Changes
  •Will you be in hot water as the rates rise?
  •What about Solar?
  •Time shifting your load
  •Where do I start?
  •Think like Scrooge
  •Heating water can be a tankless job
  •Q: Should I buy a DC furnace fan?
  •Turning an Emergency into an Inconvenience
  •The Shock of the Bill
  •Recipe for Kitchen Cuts
  •Shedding some light on the subject
  •The phantom strikes


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© 2004-2017 John Ford

 
Become an Educated Energy Consumer    OttawaEnergyAudit     Sunday 22 October 2017
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Published Columns: January 2007
Curbing Your Consumption:
Appliance Comparison

By John Ford

The biggest challenge consumers face in their quest for savings on the electricity bill is knowing where to start. Until you measure the consumption of each appliance and see how it compares to others, you will be unable to look at the big picture. This month we'll give some examples that you can use to see where to start. It may even pique your curiosity and motivate you into borrowing a meter and drawing your own big picture.

Appliance

Watts (On)

Watts (Off)

Hours/Day

kWh/Month

Cost/Month

Television

75

5

4

12

$1.30

Big Screen TV

600

12

4

80

$8.57

LCD TV 20”

35

5

4

7

$0.78

Fridge (old)

300

(averaged)

24

219

$23.37

Fridge (new)

50

(averaged)

24

37

$3.89

Lamp CF

13

0

6

2

$0.25

Lamp Incand.

60

0

6

11

$1.17

Toaster

1500

0

12 min

9

$0.97

Kettle

1800

0

21 min

19

$2.04

Xbox

300

10

2

25

$2.60

Heater

1500

0

8

91

$9.74

LED Xmas Lights

1

0

24

0.7

$0.08

Xmas Lights

150

0

24

110

$11.68

Halogen x4

200

0

6

55

$5.84

CF x2

46

0

6

8

$0.90

Furnace

550

5

8

136

$14.54

Air Conditioner

5000

5

8

1219

$130.07

Computer

120

15

6

30

$3.21

Porch Light

100

0

12

37

$3.89

Porch Light CF

23

0

12

8

$0.90

Water Heater

3000

0

6

548

$58.41

The values for the table have been picked to try and show some typical numbers, but they may not represent your home. Note the difference between the old and new fridge. Is it cost effective to replace it? Lighting is not necessarily a significant portion of the bill, and is even less so when compact fluorescent bulbs are used. Compare the four 50 watt halogen lamps with the two 23 watt CF bulbs for equivalent lighting. You can see that traditional Christmas lights should be put on a timer, but that LED lights use so little, a timer would add to their consumption. Air Conditioning can dwarf most other consumption. Heating water varies with the number of users, and can also be one of the largest energy hogs.

John Ford is a technology consultant, owner of a small energy conservation business, and the Energy Advocate for the Green Party of Ontario.